#SewHappyBeingMe , or at least I'm trying to be.

As this months theme is all things summer, sun and holidays… we thought this month would be a good time to talk about the link between sewing and body positivity !

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Although shopping sounds like a fun day out, for many it turns in to a chore and can actually leave you feeling pretty rubbish. There is nothing worse than finding an item you love hanging up in a store, then trying it on in the changing rooms to realise you are in-between sizes, it’s too big round the bust but too small around the waist, they don’t have your size or it just doesn’t look as nice on as you hoped.

We often have people come along to your classes wanting to learn to make clothing to fit them perfectly, after all we are all unique. Personally I think this is a big part of dress making, along with making items that NO-ONE else will have of course. The feeling you get trying on an item you have made that fits and flatters you perfectly is amazing and really does give you a big boost of confidence! It can make you go from only wearing long sleeved blouses to short sleeve now that you have mastered how to sew the perfect shape to suit your style.

You don’t even need to always make items from scratch either. Once you are feeling confident with your sewing skills you can always alter or put your own little twist on items you already have or that you buy from a high street store/charity shop.

Summer Sewing

Ah Summer. We all crave the nicer weather but when it comes to dressing for it we often want to dig back out our tights and oversized wooly jumpers. Many of us would rather sit in the office over heating & sweating than have our bare legs or arms out…and don’t even get me started on the dreaded B word… yup you guessed it, the BEACH.

Whether you prefer a bikini or an all in one, no matter what your shape or size , the fear when stepping out in swimwear 100% crosses everyones mind, even if only for a split second. BUT WHY?! Luckily despite the rise of everyone wanting to look perfect thanks to the likes of photo editing and instagram (such a blessing and a curse) , there has also been a rise in #bodypositivity and all round #selflove .

As I already mentioned, being able to make items that flatter your body shape and suit your style is a confidence boost in itself. I always feel a lot more body confident wearing something I am proud to have made and want to show off, this also goes for beach wear.

#SewHappyBeingMe , or at least I’m trying to be!

#SewHappyBeingMe , or at least I’m trying to be!

I was lucky enough to spend two weeks of February in Thailand. As you can imagine it was VERY hot and sunny which meant wearing jumpers and jeans was not an option. For those of you who have met me at our Glasgow studio, you will say I am ‘crazy’ & i’m often told I have an ‘amazing body’ & to stop being ‘stupid’ - this doesn’t mean I feel the same! I know technically I am pretty slim but I can honestly say I don’t feel it 9 times out of 10 but I am working on it this year. I even put up a bikini photo on my social media from Thailand in a bikini THAT I MADE…even though it did take me at least 5 times of posting it and deleting it to FINALLY have the guts to leave it up. Normally I prefer being able to ‘hide away’ more in an all in one costume or will wear big tops over my swimwear while walking about at the beach, but I was chuffed with what I had made (I even designed and printed the fabric!) so I couldn’t miss the opportunity to at least try get some nice photos of it while in the beautiful Island of Koh Samui. There is always something kind of liberating when wearing items you’ve made, I couldn’t pose like this in any shop bought bikini but do you know what - THIS WAS MADE BY ME, FOR ME! So I am going to own it as best as my awkward posing can.

Yes, as you can see I am hiding my face & you can barely even see the print on the bikini…BUT I TRIED. One of the big issues with social media is people can look at what you post and think you are so confident/in love with yourself in a vain way when in reality, most of us are pretty insecure and not happy about one thing or another.

Looking back at this photo I think how great a day it was, i’ve stopped zooming in worrying if people can see my stretch marks, hairy legs or that I have tan (burn) lines. Oh and of course it also makes me think - ‘I CAN’T BELIEVE I MADE THAT !’.


YOUR TASK

I know many people probably won’t want to share holiday photos of them in a swimming costume, but here at Sew Confident we would LOVE to see you share any type of old holiday photos that make you genuinely HAPPY, or even post a photo of something you have made that makes you feel AMAZING. Not wanting to share it with EVERYONE? Why not post it in the private Sew Confident Facebook group which is full of lovely supportive crafty folk (aka YOU LOT!)

PS. Brownie points for those confident enough to share photos in swimwear they have also MADE ;)

Be sure to tag our social media pages and use the hashtag #SewHappyBeingMe so we can see all your great posts. Any thoughts or comments on this particular topic or blog post? Be sure to leave a comment below.

Lots of LOVEEEE,

SC Colette x

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Guest blog: RTW vs ME MADE

Hi everyone, Sew Confident regular Laura here!

I’ve heard and read many reasons why people make their own clothes but rarely is the reason ‘to save money and protect the environment’ because we all know making our own clothes quite often costs more money. I can only speak for myself on the environment side of the debate and say that I am happy making some of my own clothes contributes to protecting the environment but that’s all I will say on the matter as the debate over fast fashion and slow fashion is another blog entirely. 

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For now I want to share my thoughts on ready to wear and me made items of clothing.  Looking through other sewists #makenine2019 goals and their resewloutions for 2019 I saw a lot of people wanting to eliminate their wardrobe of all ready to wear clothing and others wanting to buy nothing ready to wear in 2019.  It made me feel guilt for enjoying my ready to wear (RTW) clothes, like I wasn’t dedicated enough to making my own clothes.  I enjoy fashion and mixing my wardrobe with both me made items and ready to wear items, I mostly own ready to wear items as my sewing journey has just began.  Completely eliminating fashion retailers would deny me my inspiration.

Some of my much loved clothing is ready to wear, my wedding dress for one.  Although I have seen some beautiful me made wedding dresses by some very talented sewers and I wish I could have had more of a hand in my own but it does not dull how much I adore my wedding dress.  I still have the outfit I was wearing the night I met my husband.  I have a coat my gran bought me on one of our many shopping trips, she is no longer fit enough to come shopping with me and I treasure that item of clothing. 

Some items of clothing I have wanted to make have not come to pass, last year I wanted to make a dress to wear to wear to a friend’s wedding but due to being pregnant I decided to go down the route of ready to wear instead. 

The me made section of my wardrobe makes me very proud and I love to show it off but I am equally proud of my ready to wear section, I am trying to grow my me made wardrobe and make more conscious buys in relation to clothing.  I am also trying to use up my stash rather than spend money on more fabric.  Finding the time to make these clothes is proving difficult at the moment with a new baby, however, slowly but surely I am doing bit by bit nap by nap. 

Personally I prefer my wardrobe to be a mix of me made and ready to wear and I always try to remember that dressmaking is a hobby not a way of life (for me).  I think eliminating your ready to wear wardrobe would be difficult if not impossible for most and I don’t completely agree with the reasons why.  I’d be interested to hear other people’s thoughts on their ready to wear vs me made wardrobe over on the Sew Confident ‘sewcial’ fb group. If you haven’t already joined, you can do so here whether you are a SC customer or now!

Love Laura


WANT TO LEARN HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN SLOW-FASHION, ME MADE ITEMS? check out our up coming classes  here .

WANT TO LEARN HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN SLOW-FASHION, ME MADE ITEMS? check out our up coming classes here.

Capsule Wardrobe: Bottoms up!

Straight leg, boot cut, cropped, ankle grazers…. the list goes on when it comes to various styles of trousers making it a more popular choice than ever when it comes to being a staple piece in the modern ladies wardrobe. Despite their increasing popularity over the years, trousers weren’t considered ‘acceptable’ women’s attire until the 1970s and even then, in some places it was illegal for women to wear trousers! These days, trousers are worn by women for all occasions without any masculine connotations . One of the woman we can also thank for this is, Coco Chanel - The first woman who dared to wear a pair of pants in her daily life.

Ash Jeans Pattern Set

Ash Jeans Pattern Set

JEANS

“History of Jeans and Denim. Jeans are pants made from denim or dungaree cloth. They were invented by Jacob Davis and Levi Strauss in 1873 and a worn still but in a different context. Jeans are named after the city of Genoa in Italy, a place where cotton corduroy, called either jean or jeane, was manufactured.”

Now many sew-ers seem to have a fear when it comes to wanting to tackle making their own jeans but we think they are the most satisfying make! Here are some patterns, both from Megan Nielsen Patterns , which cover different styles in each pack! :

Dawn Jeans (4 in 1)

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Ash Jeans (4 in 1)

VINTAGE

Not only does this 1940s vintage pattern by Simplicity come with the patterns for amazing loose fitting pants & the great overalls…it also comes with a sweet blouse and blouse with hood pattern.

FITTED

I could go on for ages about various trouser patterns I love, I will quickly mention the Tyyni Cigarette trouser pattern by NAMED. I personally think these would be the perfect capsule wardrobe make. These trousers are so flattering that they would look great for both work or day-to-day !

Capsule Wardrobe: A 'short' history of skirts

The skirt: a garment so distinctly feminine that in the 1800s, the word itself was slang for woman. This particular item of clothing comes with a lot of history too. The skirt is said to be the second-oldest garment known to mankind, with loin cloths winning the award for the oldest.

Today, a skirt's design is all about personal style. But not long ago, long skirts were the only way to go. For hundreds of years, a long skirt was the very definition of luxury, mainly because fabric was so expensive.

Here are some of my favourite classic styles and patterns to create your own!

THE PENCIL SKIRT

Here at SC HQ are totally loving the Pulmu High-waisted Pencil Skirt by NAMED. Whether you love wearing a pencil skirt to work or dressing it up for a night out at the weekend - we think this particular pattern would work well whatever the occasion!

THE MINI SKIRT

THE DENIM SKIRT

Available to create in various lengths, the Leonora denim style skirt by SEAMWORK would make a gorgeous wardrobe stable! This particular pattern features all of the usual denim garment constructions, including flat felled seams, a classic back yoke, belt loops, and jean hardware. Perfect for those looking to maybe advanced there garment making knowledge.

THE MAXI SKIRT

Depending how confident you are when it comes to sewing and drafting patterns, it is easy enough to draw out and make your own maxi skirt pattern! If not, you will often find them included as part of a set in many of the ‘old school’ patterns such as this one by NEW LOOK. It also includes patterns for a tank top, tee shirt, pull on pants and maxi dress with side slits which could also be makes for your ‘me-made’ capsule wardrobe!


Want to have a go at making a skirt or another item of clothing but unsure where to start? Why not book on to one of our pattern classes at either our GLASGOW or DUNDEE studios to get a helping hand from one of our amazing tutors!

PS. As always, remember to tag @sewconfident in any photos of your creations AND use the hashtag #scCapsuleWardrobe as at the end of April we will be picking one lucky winner to win a fantastic mystery prize!

Capsule Wardrobe: The Top (Free pattern included!)

After covering all things coats and jackets in the last capsule wardrobe blog post, it is time to move on to one of the essentials: Tops. Whether its’s shirts, vest tops, blouses, bralets or off the shoulder - you can’t leave the house without one. (Well you could, but it isn’t exactly seen as socially acceptable).

In my opinion a top can make or break and outfit…I’d even go as far to say it is the most seen item of clothing you will wear, if you think about it. Sitting at a desk/restaurant or in photos, it is normally the next thing people will notice after your face.

That is why when planning your ‘me-made’ capsule wardrobe it is important to not only pick something versatile but something that will also show off your style at a glance.

In this quick blog post I am going to tell you about one of the tops I am going to create, and which some of you might already have made; the hemlock tee! This is the beauty that we cover in our overlocker class and it is just a great dress-up or dress-down item. The pattern is by Grainline Studio and best of all, it is FREE! You can download it for yourself >> here <<

What I love about this pattern (along with the fact is is free), is that by simply changing the fabric you make it in, it almost looks like a totally different design! So don’t be scared to experiment with various weights of jersey or bold/fun prints. You can also mess around with the size/length of this top making it go from off the shoulder crop top to front knot tied cami !

Wanting to try one for yourself but unsure about where to start when it comes to stretch fabrics or the overlocker? Just give us a shout!

Sew Confident Founder Jenny modelling some of her lovely hemlock tee makes!

Taking part in this months capsule wardrobe theme? Remember to tag us @sewconfident and use the hashtag #SCcapsulewardrobe to win some prizes and be shared on our social media pages and mailing list. Not yet on our mailing list? Sign up here to be the first to hear about all things Sew Confident and receive some mailing list only deals.

Capsule Wardrobe : History of Two Coats

With this months theme being all about creating your own, ‘me-made’ capsule wardrobe, I thought it would be interesting to not only tell you some of my pattern choices but explore the history behind them! In this first post I will be looking at all things outer wear. Remember to keep us updated on your capsule wardrobe makes this month by tagging us and using #SCcapsulewardrobe !

The Trench Coat

Trench coat pattern by ‘NAMED’

Trench coat pattern by ‘NAMED’

The trench coat was developed as an alternative to the heavy serge greatcoats worn by British and French soldiers in the First World War. Invention of the trench coat is claimed by two British luxury clothing manufacturers, Burberry and Aquascutum. Usually made from of waterproof heavy-duty cotton gabardine drill, leather, or poplin. The classic versions come in various lengths ranging from just above the ankles (the longest) to above the knee (the shortest). Traditionally this garment is double-breasted with 10 front buttons, has wide lapels, a storm flap and pockets that button-close. The coat is belted at the waist with a self-belt, as well as having straps around the wrists that also buckle (to keep water from running down the forearm when using binoculars in the rain). The coat often has shoulder straps that button-close; those were a functional feature in a military context. Originally the trench coat was an item of clothing for Army officers (developed before the war but adapted for use in the trenches of the First World War, hence its name). Trench coats have remained fashionable in the decades following World War II. Their original role as part of an army officers uniform lent the trench coat a businesslike respectability, although many prefer to tie the belt in front (rather than use the buckle) to project a more casual look than strict military dress.

Want to learn how to make your own Trench coat? Book on to Jennys Trench Coat Class now!

The Denim Jacket

Denim Jacket Pattern by SEAMWORK

Denim Jacket Pattern by SEAMWORK

Denim blue jeans trace their history back to 1860s Italy -- if not earlier --the rugged bottoms haven’t gone out of fashion since, and over time have worked their way up to the top half of the body, sported by figures as iconic as Marilyn Monroe and the Marlboro Man. Todays denim jacket exudes a sense of sturdy individualism, but it took many decades to establish itself as a pillar of fashion. Around 1905, American jeans manufacturer Levi Strauss and Co. introduced the “Levi Blouse,” an outerwear shirt intended as a companion to work pantaloons. By 1938, the blouse was officially redubbed a “jacket.” Strauss produced six versions of the jacket through 1947, making minor additions and variations. The late 1940s and & 50s saw the denim jacket transition from workwear into day-to-day attire as Strauss introduced lightweight coats in its western wear line. Although Levis premiered a womens jean jacket in the late & 40s, a denim-wearing Marilyn Monroe made the piece fashionable for mainstream women -- cementing the jacket as a unisex staple -- during a 1950s photo shoot. For men, icons such as James Dean helped to associate the denim jacket with a sense of individualism. By 1962, Levis settled on the double-breast pocket featured on most modern jean jackets. Later, hippie culture experimented with everything from shearling lining to sleeveless denim jackets. Want to learn to make your own like Sew Confident Colette? Check out our Denim Jacket Class!

Capsule Wardrobe - An Introduction

With the Great British Sewing Bee now coming to an end (booooo), we hope you are all feeling creative and motivated to get sewing more yourself!

For the month of April the theme at Sew Confident HQ is ‘Sew the perfect capsule wardrobe’. Here are some top hints and tips to help you with ‘Planning a me-made capsule wardrobe’. Fancy joining in and creating your own personal capsule wardrobe? Be sure to tag us in any posts of your makes and use the hashtag #SCCapsuleWardrobe (We'll be giving a pattern bundle to one lucky winner at the end of the month)

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Part One: Pre Planning

  1. What is the dress code?

  2. Is it for work, home, active wardrobe?

  3. What colour scheme?

  4. What can I create that will ‘complete’ and work with items already in my wardrobe?

Part Two: Planning

  1. Make drafts, take your time and make the perfect choices.

  2. Is there patterns you can use that you already own?

  3. Do you already have suitable fabric for any of your pieces or do you need to source more?

  4. Are the items you have chosen to create appropriate for more than one season?

  5. Do you have all the skills needed to create these items or do you need some extra help?

    Part Three: Get Started!

  1. Start with the most exciting piece

  2. Get help when needed ( I heard Sew Confident have some good classes for this… )

  3. Stick to creating your capsule wardrobe

  4. Post it, promote it, be proud of it!

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Keep an eye out for my other blogs this month where I will be telling you all about my capsule wardrobe picks, the history behind those items and some of my favourite patterns to make them yourself! REMINDER: Fancy joining in with this months ‘capsule wardrobe’ theme? Be sure to tag us in any posts of your makes AND use the hashtag #SCCapsuleWardrobe (We'll be giving a pattern bundle to one lucky winner at the end of the month).



Catwalk to Cutting Table - LBD with a twist

Intern Kirstys, Catwalk to Cutting Table

London Fashion Week has JUST ended and you know what that means, we get to take a closer look at all the designers and see who’s managed to create something amazing.

Personally one of my favourite designers from this years LFW was RIXO. They tend to design fun, quirky and stylish dresses.

The design that caught my eye, was this off the shoulder, black velvet fitted dress, with a colourful dot fabric at the bust area. This stood out to me as the contrast between the soft black fabric and the bright dots at the top defined each section of the dress.

I have even managed to find the perfect fabric copies and similar pattern. Although this may look complicated and impossible to recreate yourself. ITS NOT! So why not give it a go.

Feel like you may need some extra help, or feel you want to take your knowledge further? Why no come along to one of our pattern classes. For more information on these classes please feel free to contact us.

Hope to see you soon.

Love, Kirsty

For the spot fabric, click here. For the black velvet, click here.

M7719 MISSES' DRESSES PATTERN

M7719 MISSES' DRESSES PATTERN

Frida Frenzy

Everywhere we look there is Frida Kahlo designs to be seen! What are your thoughts on this latest trend or are you still a little unsure on who this famous mono brow lady even is…?

Who is Frida?

Considered one of the Mexico's greatest artist, Frida Kahlo was born on July 6, 1907 in Coyocoan, Mexico City, Mexico.  Frida painted many portraits, self-portraits and works inspired by the nature and artefacts of Mexico. Inspired by the country's popular culture, she employed a naïve folk art style to explore questions of identity, post-colonialism, gender, class and race in Mexican society. Her paintings often had strong autobiographical elements and mixed realism with fantasy. In addition to belonging to the post-revolutionary Mexicayotl movement, which sought to define a Mexican identity, Kahlo has been described as a surrealist or magical realist.


Sew Confident does Frida

Never wanting to miss a trend, here at Sew Confident we have created our very own, super cool item. DRUM ROLL PLEASE… Ladies & Gentleman, now available via the website or from our studios - A Frida hand embroidery kit!


Wanting to see what else we are loving? Check out below some of Colettes best finds! Just click the image to follow on to the website I found them on.

Cat Walk To Cutting Table - The Denim Jacket

The denim jacket is an indispensable wardrobe basic. Each year the denim jacket can be seen on the Cat Walk as a designer tries to put their own twist on the classic. Lately we have seen some classy, embellished jackets on Elie Saab A/W 18 catwalk.

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Here are some images from my first attempt at a 'denim' jacket which I made for my holiday. The pattern is from seamwork & called 'Audrey'. I also used the brand new Sew Confident original printed fabric - it looks so fun, I want to make one out of all 4 prints we have!

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It wasn't actually that easy to source heavy weight/good quality plain denim but having made this Jacket now myself, you might want to start with a lighter weight material until you have gave it a go. There is a good few layers, button holes etc so do also consider what your sewing machine can handle! The Elna 340s which we use in our studios worked great with my jacket.

To create your own version of the embellished Elie Saab jacket, you might want to go through your cupboard of rubbish & see if you still have one of these beauties.... (TOLD YOU IT WOULD COME IN HANDY ONE DAY MUM!!)

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Crazy For Corsets

Corsets Today

In todays society, corsets are usually only seen when it comes to costumes, stage performance or "waist training"; although a few do still buy or make them for the uses that they were designed for hundreds of years ago. Celebrities such as Lady Gaga, Madonna & Beyonce often wear corsets on stage while touring to add drama and femininity to their performances. High fashion designers such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Alexander McQueen have been seen regularly using corsets or similar in their collections. Among many celebrities, reality star Kim Kardashion uses a waist trainer to "achieve a small waist" (DO NOT TRY THIS NONSENSE AT HOME!)

You are more likely to see a corset 'inspired' fashion piece such as the one pictured below which can be purchased from ASOS.com. (I must admit I am not a fan of these 'fashion corset/wasbie, over the tshirt' looks but each to their own!)

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The History of Corsets

If you read online there is various conflicting reasons for why corsets were created. Was it to change a persons body shape? Was it to supports ladies chests? WAS IT TO HELP WITH BACK PAIN? I just don't know the correct answer so I am just going with what wikipedia says since that is OBVIOUSLY true...

"The earliest known representation of a possible corset appears on a Cretan figurine made in c.1600 BC. The article of clothing depicted might be perceived as a corset, but is worn as an outer garment, and leaves the breasts exposed."

"The corset first became popular in sixteenth-century Europe, reaching the zenith of its popularity in the Victorian era. While the corset has typically been worn as an undergarment, it has occasionally been used as an outer-garment; corsets as outer-garments can be seen in the national dress of many European countries


Want to know more or learn how to make your own corset?

Whether you just want to push your sewing skills to the limit, have an interest in historical fashion or want to wear your handmade corset this is the class for you! Our fabulous tutor Emma with take you through the practical corset making process whilst also telling you all about the history of corsets - she's an expert!

At this course you will learn:

  • Corset Tailoring
  • Toile fitting
  • Pattern alterations
  • Working with synthetic whale boning and steel boning.
  • Hand finishing skills
  • Inserting eyelets.
  • History of corsets

To find out more or book on, follow the yellow bric...ok just follow this link: https://bookeo.com/sewconfidentglasgow?devent=42552P9MXRP164ACFAFAD4_2018-10-20_8cCcV6gciO0w

SUMMER IS COMING...slowly. - PS, FREE PATTERNS

There may still be some slushy snow on the ground but my head is already thinking ahead to Summer and booking as many holidays as my small bank balance can afford!

When it comes to holiday there is nothing more annoying than turning up at ocean beach in Ibiza (or even your hotel pool in Benidorm) wearing the same swimwear as everyone else. Maybe it is just me, but I would much rather be tanning myself up in a unique fun bikini than comparing myself to 4 different girls all in the same Primark 2-piece as me.

Sure there is a lot of online independent designers making more unique swimwear but at AT LEAST £40 a pop, it is money I would much rather be putting towards on a first class flight out of here (ok maybe a £9.99 Ryanair flight...)

Lucky for those who are still with me on this fashion faux pas, I have found 4 FREE, YES FREE!, swimwear patterns to make your own .

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When it comes to making swimwear it is important to consider the following: 

  • How do you make a swimsuit?
  • What fabric do you need to buy to make swimwear?
  • Where can you buy swimwear fabric?
  • Where to source hardware?
  • Sanitary requirements for swimsuits?
  • Where to buy hygienic liners?
  • Standard swimsuit sizing?

Modern swimwear is sewn with knit fabrics. Most readily available fabric that’s labeled as “swimsuit fabric” is a combination of nylon and spandex: The nylon is lightweight, easy to care for and dries quickly. The spandex gives it stretch and allows for a figure-hugging fit. Most swimwear fabrics are 80 to 90 percent nylon and 10 to 20 percent spandex.

This type of knit fabric is woven to create a four-way stretch, which means the fabric will stretch about 60 to 70 percent in either direction. Be sure to check for adequate stretch in your fabric. Plus, if your fabric has a print or pattern, see what happens to the pattern when stretched, so that the print looks good all over your finished swimsuit.

When shopping for swimsuit fabrics, check the section labeled “dance wear” or “exercise wear.” This is usually where you’ll find nylon-spandex blends along with various linings. Whichever fabric you choose for your, swimsuit make sure you carefully choose the other components like elastics, thread and lining. Swimsuit elastics are available and have resistance to the degradation of pool chemicals and sunshine. If lining your swimwear, choose one which has similar properties of stretch and fiber content as your main fabric. 

OK! ENOUGH OF THE BORING (but important) INFORMATION, HERE ARE THE FREE PATTERNS:

1. Free Bikini Triangle Top Pattern - How to make it in 8 easy steps -
http://www.sirenapatterns.com/blog/2016/7/11/diy-bikini-triangle-top

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2. Ruched 2 piece Bikini from Sew Mama Sew- http://www.sewmamasew.com/2011/05/summer-sewing-free-swimsuit-pattern-tutorial/

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3.  Free pattern and tutorial: triangle bikini from Pattydoo

 https://www.pattydoo.de/en/blog/2015/07/free-pattern-and-tutorial-triangle-bikini

4. Small collection of basic swimsuit blocks from ralphpink.

https://www.ralphpink.com/free-swimwear-sewing-patterns/

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Lots of love, Colette x

March Sew-er of the Month - JANE

Say a Big Hello to Sew Confident Loyal - Jane!

1. So Jane, How long have you been sewing?

I’ve always wanted to learn to sew and I took a short beginners class about 2 years ago.  I loved it but wanted to do more and I wanted to make things that I’d actually wear/use. About a year ago I found Sew Confident and haven’t looked back since!!

2. Why did you start sewing?

I’ve always wanted to sew my own clothes.  You know when you see that ‘almost’ perfect outfit but wish the sleeves were a bit different, the length was longer/shorter  or it was in a different material. I just think it is amazing to be able to alter or make your own clothes to be exactly what you personally want.

3. Sounds like we could have a future fashion designer in our classes... What sewing project are you most proud of?

I love my wee 2 piece suit from Colette’s Co-ord class.  The material is so nice and it’s fleecy on the inside so keeps me nice and cosy!!  Colette taught me how to incorporate the fringing detail from the edge of the fabric and I think it looks really fab!  My own version of a Channel jacket!! I also like my coat I made at the pattern class – it was a bit adventurous and the 1st time I’ve done something that is lined, but I think it turned out ok.

4. Both your co-ord and jacket look AMAZING! You will be giving Channel a run for their money in no time. What do your friends and family think about your sewing skills, are they impressed or do they use you as a free alterations service?

I think they’re just astonished I can do it!!  Haha. I remember showing my Mum some fabric I got one day.  I was so excited about it that I went ahead and cut a wrap dress out that night and sewed it up.  She couldn’t believe it when she saw the finished dress the very next day!! No one has really asked me to hem anything yet – maybe they’re waiting for me to build my skills up!!

5. That is so nice, there really is no better feeling than saying you made something yourself! SO, What sewing accessory could you not live without?

Jenny and Colette on speed dial!! ☺ haha! Actually – this is a bit silly, but since Jenny taught me how to use the needle threader on my machine, I can’t live without it!!  I don’t think I can actually thread the machine needle by myself anymore!

 

6. You know you are more than welcome to drop us a message or e-mail whenever you need!! Next question, If you could go back to your beginner days and give yourself one sewing tip or piece of advice what would it be?

Probably a bit predictable but...Just keep sewing and don’t worry too much about mistakes.  No-one else notices them! I think I put myself under pressure to make everything absolutely perfect but you’ll never get any better unless you keep practising.

7. Since your beginner days, have you had any sewing disasters?

Yes! Loads!  I can be a bit slap dash so end up unpicking things all the time!!

8. Sadly I think the unpick is most sew-ers best friend!! How many classes have you attended?

I’m a bit addicted to attending classes!!  My first was the shirt dress class which was amazing.  Lovely people on it (looking at you Amanda and Amrit!) and it was the first time I’d been able to make something I actually wanted to wear!  I’ve done the overlocker for beginners, underwear class, Advent Calendar class, 5 week Pattern class (with another amazing bunch of people) , 121’s and Colette’s Co-ord class.  I’ve got the Initial hand embroidery class coming up which looks amazing. I adore the ‘Sewcial’s’ too and get to as many as possible. One of the best things about every class is the lovely people you meet – we’ve had some great chat and interesting stories.

9. That is a LOT of classes, You really are a Sew Confident Loyal!! What would you like to be able to sew in the future, what is the dream?

My dream is to be able to draft my own patterns – just think up a design and be able to draft a pattern and make it.  I’d also like to become more skilled in altering bought patterns to fit me the way I want. At my last 121 with Jenny we drafted a pattern for a jersey skirt (I have a new obsession with the pattern master – what a piece of kit!!) and it’s fab – I’d like to do more of that.

10. **Takes note of future pattern drafting class idea**...What projects do you have on the go right now?

I’m so naughty for starting loads of projects at one time!!  I tried to focus myself this year with the ‘make 9 in 2018’ challenge.  I’ve already finished some – next one to finish is the Sew Over It Eve dress – I’m taking that one to the next Sewcial for a bit of help!

11. We are excited to see you & your project along at the Sewcial! Last question, What would you say to someone who was thinking of taking up sewing?

DO IT!  It is so relaxing and de-stressing, it’s an amazing skill to have and you’ll meet some really lovely people.

Dress Like Royalty For Less

Who doesn't love Prince Harry?! And it seems everyone loves his Bride-to-be (and previously, suits actress) Meghan Markle, who today joined the Queen and senior royals for her first official engagement with the monarch.

Often hitting headlines for her outfit choices, Meghan isn't the first member of (soon to be) royalty that everyone is obsessed with - who can forget Princess Dianas AMAZING outfits?! 
 

As Miss Markle was pictured today heading to Westminster Abbey this afternoon, social media was going crazy for her jacket pictured below. I took it upon myself to find where this Jacket was from as I ALWAYS look at something and wonder how much it would cost me to make. (I'm hoping i'm not the only one who does this...)

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave following the Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey this afternoon (Monday 12th March - 2018)

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave following the Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey this afternoon (Monday 12th March - 2018)

 

I found the exact coat Meghan Markle is wearing on www.amandawakeley.com . This cream sculpted tailoring crombie coat would only set you back £895... bargain eh? FEAR NOT, I am about to suggest various patterns & fabrics which will allow you to make this key waredrobe piece for much, much less!

 

 


The Patterns

I have found 3 different patterns, none of which are an EXACT match but could be easily manipulated to be! With the most expensive pattern being £8.99 and all 3 coming with various other patterns...we are already on to a winner with our budget royalty knock-off!

K4225 MISSES' PRINCESS SEAM JACKET AND COAT - £8.99

NL6163 MISSES SEPARATES | EASY - £6.95

BD8292  MISSES' COAT - £7.19

The Fabric

Again I didn't spend a lot of time on finding the BEST fabric, if you go to do this for yourself i'm sure you will find something to suit you better but in the mean time, here is some possible fabric options: 

1. Designer 'Lady McElroy' Graceful Cream Wool Mix Felt Coating - £29.50 p/m  - Available from www.sherwoodsfabrics.co.uk

2. LIVIA - A Superior High-Demand Pure Wool with Stretch - £17.90 p/m - Available from www.sherwoodsfabrics.co.uk 

3. 'Soft Coat Fabric In Cream' - £8.95 p/m - Available from www.myfabrics.co.uk 


Going for even the most expensive pattern and fabric that I have found, you can make a version of this Meghan Markle coat for under £100!

Be sure to send us in a photo to hello@sewconfident.co.uk if you decide to give this a go at home, and if you would like some help remember you can come along to one of our pattern classes or monthly sew-cials

Lots of love, Colette x

Make a start on your Christmas party outfits!

It is definitely time to start thinking about just WHAT to wear for all those Christmas parties you are looking forward to (Or being dragged along to). Well the best conversation starter and way to impress your colleges this festive season is to make your own amazing outfit!! (This also means you wont have the embarrassment of turning up in the same outfit as Annoying Anne who works on the 2nd floor). Here at Sew Confident HQ we have saved you a bit of the hassle and looked out some patterns we think would make AMAZING party wear!

PAPERCUT PATTERNS

Sapporo coat from PAPERCUT patterns&nbsp;

Sapporo coat from PAPERCUT patterns 

Mito cami/dress from PAPERCUT patterns

Mito cami/dress from PAPERCUT patterns

Sea-bell Dress from PAPERCUT patterns

Sea-bell Dress from PAPERCUT patterns

NAMED PATTERNS

Elizabeth Gown from NAMED patterns

Elizabeth Gown from NAMED patterns

Leotie Midi Dress from NAMED patterns

Leotie Midi Dress from NAMED patterns

Ailakki Cross Front Jumpsuit

Ailakki Cross Front Jumpsuit

BY HAND - LONDON

Alix Dress from BY HAND LONDON

Alix Dress from BY HAND LONDON

Orsola Dress &amp; skirt from BY HAND LONDON

Orsola Dress & skirt from BY HAND LONDON

Kim Dress from BY HAND LONDON

Kim Dress from BY HAND LONDON

Are you making this years Christmas outfit? Send us some photos!

Colette x

Sew Confident sew-along! (Week 1)

WELCOME!

This first week is just more of an introduction, I will tell you where I got everything I needed for the project...my chosen fabrics...why I picked this pattern for the sew-along and more!

We will be making the 'Portside travel set' from Grainline studio. (available here) I picked this pattern, since as we all know, 'WINTER IS COMING' (said in the best game of throne voice of course) which means it is time to start thinking about Christmas gifts.

I like this pattern as it would make a lovely gift for ladies and gents & there is endless possibilities on fabrics you can mix & match to make it look totally different each time! I also picked this pattern as I think people would be more interested in giving themselves a bit of a challenge while still being able to get a bit of help too! I haven't had a test run at making this set yet myself so who knows...maybe you lot will be giving me hints and tips!!

Where I got everything I need

  • The pattern - Grainline studio
  • The interfacing - Sewconfident website
  • The Zips - smaller zips from Sew Confident, (large 21" zip I got on ebay!)
  • D rings - Sew Confident
  • Swivel clips - Sew Confident
  • Fabric 1 - Canvas fabric from Ikea (only £4 a metre!!)
  • Fabric 2 - Fake leather look fabric from The Cotton Print Factory (£7 a metre)
  • Lining - Remenant kings
  • Webbing for straps - For the sizes mentioned in the pattern I ordered this on ebay in big 10m rolls as it worked out cheaper than buying just the 2m ... guess ill just make a few bags!

What is the sew along all about?

The sew-along is all about bringing all us sewing lovers together and helping/showing off to each other our great talent!! I will be posting an update of my progress once a week for about 3 weeks (maybe more if anyone joining in wants extra tips!) So make sure you tag us in any photos/videos on any of your social media and use the hash tag #SCsewalong !


If you have any questions just drop me an e-mail -  colette@sewconfident.co.uk ,

Love Colette x

IMG_20171103_171639.jpg

Why pay a bomb for Balmain when you can have the dress for less?

Ever catch your reflection in shop windows looking at designer clothing you wish you could afford? Well why spend thousands for designer clothing when you could be your own designer and make something similar yourself for much less! 

THE DRESS

Today we are taking a look at this amazing designer, tartan tweed mini dress by Balmain from Net-A-Porter. For those of us lucky enough to be able to afford this £2,390(!!) dress made in Italy, you are living the dream! But don't worry, for those that are left counting our pennies the week before pay day we have found the perfect pattern and possible fabrics to make this for 36x cheaper!

You might be thinking, this is a bit covered up for summer but if you're anything like us it takes a while to find the time to finish a pattern, so like the designers, we're thinking ahead!

We've found the perfect pattern and the perfect fabric for you to make your own version for only £65!!

 

 

 

 

 

THE PATTERN

  • Misses and Miss Plus 1960s Vintage Dresses. Simplicity Sewing Pattern No. 1012. Get it here!
  • Head back to the 1960's. This vintage dress has neckline variations. Make it retro in colour blocked panels and collars, which is modern again, or go classic in a single fabric/colour.
  • Available to buy a printable version

THE FABRIC

 

  • £30 per meter
  • A medium weight wool and viscose blend tweed fabric in beautiful plum purple and turquoise. This loose weave tweed is made with a variety of colourful yarns. This stunning warm fabric is perfect for winter garments.
  • This fabric is 150cm (approx. 60”)wide.
  • Many different tweed fabrics also available on TruroFabrics.com 

 

So there we have it! You're very own Balmain dress for £65! Why not bring all your patterns along to our next Sewing Pattern Class?!

 

 

Colette x

Hello My Name is Paul Smith

Hello My Name is Paul Smith

“Hello, my name is Paul Smith” invited us into designer Paul’s world of inspirations, creations, collaborations and fashion last month. I hadn't known much about the designer beforehand, so I was looking forward to checking out the fashion exhibition first hand. The first showcase included a recreation of Paul’s first ever shop; a small 3x3m space opened in Nottingham in 1970 and we were then given an exciting insight in to his many store designs he went on to open around the world and how successful the brand has been. 

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